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E.U. Orders Fish Vendors to Quit Bleaching the Seafood

E.U. Orders Fish Vendors to Quit Bleaching the Seafood


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Italian seafood vendors have been bleaching their wares against European law

Wikimedia/Enzyklofant

Europe wants Italian seafood vendors to stop bleaching squid and shellfish to make it look fresher.

Italy is home to some very good seafood, but some of its vendors may have been adulterating their wares to make it look better to customers, so this week the E.U. sent a strongly worded letter ordering Italian fish sellers to stop bleaching their seafood.

According to The Local, Italian seafood vendors often soak their squid and shellfish in a mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide to make the flesh look brighter and more appealing to customers. That use of hydrogen peroxide is reportedly not harmful to humans, and the Italian Health Ministry has no problems with the practice. The E.U., however bans it on the grounds that bleaching seafood to make it look fresher is a deceptive trick used to make customers buy older fish.

“Hydrogen peroxide is not a substance which the EU authorizes for use with certain foodstuffs,” wrote the E.U. to the Italian Health Ministry. “We therefore ask Italy to provide producers with clear information about which solutions can and can't be used to wash seafood.”

The goal might be to get the information out there, but whether or not anybody actually follows it will remain to be seen.


The Clean Kitchen Test

In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

  1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
    1. 50 °F (10 °C)
    2. 40 °F (5 °C).
    3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
    1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
    2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
    3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
    1. Last night.
    2. Several weeks ago.
    3. Can’t remember.
    1. Reused as is.
    2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
    3. Washed with soap and hot water.
    4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
    1. Rare (140 °F).
    2. Medium (155 °F).
    3. Well-done (170 °F).
    1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
    2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
    3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
    4. Not sampled until baked.
    1. Water.
    2. Hot water and soap.
    3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
    4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
    1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
    2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
    3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
    4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
    1. Wiping them on a towel.
    2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
    3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
    1. Setting them on the counter.
    2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
    3. Microwaving.
    1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
    2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
    3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
    1. Diabetes.
    2. HIV infection.
    3. Cancer.
    4. Liver disease.

    The Clean Kitchen Test

    In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

    1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
      1. 50 °F (10 °C)
      2. 40 °F (5 °C).
      3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
      1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
      2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
      3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
      1. Last night.
      2. Several weeks ago.
      3. Can’t remember.
      1. Reused as is.
      2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
      3. Washed with soap and hot water.
      4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
      1. Rare (140 °F).
      2. Medium (155 °F).
      3. Well-done (170 °F).
      1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
      2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
      3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
      4. Not sampled until baked.
      1. Water.
      2. Hot water and soap.
      3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
      4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
      1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
      2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
      3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
      4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
      1. Wiping them on a towel.
      2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
      3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
      1. Setting them on the counter.
      2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
      3. Microwaving.
      1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
      2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
      3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
      1. Diabetes.
      2. HIV infection.
      3. Cancer.
      4. Liver disease.

      The Clean Kitchen Test

      In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

      1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
        1. 50 °F (10 °C)
        2. 40 °F (5 °C).
        3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
        1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
        2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
        3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
        1. Last night.
        2. Several weeks ago.
        3. Can’t remember.
        1. Reused as is.
        2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
        3. Washed with soap and hot water.
        4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
        1. Rare (140 °F).
        2. Medium (155 °F).
        3. Well-done (170 °F).
        1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
        2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
        3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
        4. Not sampled until baked.
        1. Water.
        2. Hot water and soap.
        3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
        4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
        1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
        2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
        3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
        4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
        1. Wiping them on a towel.
        2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
        3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
        1. Setting them on the counter.
        2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
        3. Microwaving.
        1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
        2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
        3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
        1. Diabetes.
        2. HIV infection.
        3. Cancer.
        4. Liver disease.

        The Clean Kitchen Test

        In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

        1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
          1. 50 °F (10 °C)
          2. 40 °F (5 °C).
          3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
          1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
          2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
          3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
          1. Last night.
          2. Several weeks ago.
          3. Can’t remember.
          1. Reused as is.
          2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
          3. Washed with soap and hot water.
          4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
          1. Rare (140 °F).
          2. Medium (155 °F).
          3. Well-done (170 °F).
          1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
          2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
          3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
          4. Not sampled until baked.
          1. Water.
          2. Hot water and soap.
          3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
          4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
          1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
          2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
          3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
          4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
          1. Wiping them on a towel.
          2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
          3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
          1. Setting them on the counter.
          2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
          3. Microwaving.
          1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
          2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
          3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
          1. Diabetes.
          2. HIV infection.
          3. Cancer.
          4. Liver disease.

          The Clean Kitchen Test

          In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

          1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
            1. 50 °F (10 °C)
            2. 40 °F (5 °C).
            3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
            1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
            2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
            3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
            1. Last night.
            2. Several weeks ago.
            3. Can’t remember.
            1. Reused as is.
            2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
            3. Washed with soap and hot water.
            4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
            1. Rare (140 °F).
            2. Medium (155 °F).
            3. Well-done (170 °F).
            1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
            2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
            3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
            4. Not sampled until baked.
            1. Water.
            2. Hot water and soap.
            3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
            4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
            1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
            2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
            3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
            4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
            1. Wiping them on a towel.
            2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
            3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
            1. Setting them on the counter.
            2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
            3. Microwaving.
            1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
            2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
            3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
            1. Diabetes.
            2. HIV infection.
            3. Cancer.
            4. Liver disease.

            The Clean Kitchen Test

            In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

            1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
              1. 50 °F (10 °C)
              2. 40 °F (5 °C).
              3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
              1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
              2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
              3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
              1. Last night.
              2. Several weeks ago.
              3. Can’t remember.
              1. Reused as is.
              2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
              3. Washed with soap and hot water.
              4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
              1. Rare (140 °F).
              2. Medium (155 °F).
              3. Well-done (170 °F).
              1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
              2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
              3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
              4. Not sampled until baked.
              1. Water.
              2. Hot water and soap.
              3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
              4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
              1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
              2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
              3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
              4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
              1. Wiping them on a towel.
              2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
              3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
              1. Setting them on the counter.
              2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
              3. Microwaving.
              1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
              2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
              3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
              1. Diabetes.
              2. HIV infection.
              3. Cancer.
              4. Liver disease.

              The Clean Kitchen Test

              In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

              1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
                1. 50 °F (10 °C)
                2. 40 °F (5 °C).
                3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
                1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
                2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
                3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
                1. Last night.
                2. Several weeks ago.
                3. Can’t remember.
                1. Reused as is.
                2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
                3. Washed with soap and hot water.
                4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
                1. Rare (140 °F).
                2. Medium (155 °F).
                3. Well-done (170 °F).
                1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
                2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
                3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
                4. Not sampled until baked.
                1. Water.
                2. Hot water and soap.
                3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
                4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
                1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
                2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
                3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
                4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
                1. Wiping them on a towel.
                2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
                3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
                1. Setting them on the counter.
                2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
                3. Microwaving.
                1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
                2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
                3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
                1. Diabetes.
                2. HIV infection.
                3. Cancer.
                4. Liver disease.

                The Clean Kitchen Test

                In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

                1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
                  1. 50 °F (10 °C)
                  2. 40 °F (5 °C).
                  3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
                  1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
                  2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
                  3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
                  1. Last night.
                  2. Several weeks ago.
                  3. Can’t remember.
                  1. Reused as is.
                  2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
                  3. Washed with soap and hot water.
                  4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
                  1. Rare (140 °F).
                  2. Medium (155 °F).
                  3. Well-done (170 °F).
                  1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
                  2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
                  3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
                  4. Not sampled until baked.
                  1. Water.
                  2. Hot water and soap.
                  3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
                  4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
                  1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
                  2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
                  3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
                  4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
                  1. Wiping them on a towel.
                  2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
                  3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
                  1. Setting them on the counter.
                  2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
                  3. Microwaving.
                  1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
                  2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
                  3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
                  1. Diabetes.
                  2. HIV infection.
                  3. Cancer.
                  4. Liver disease.

                  The Clean Kitchen Test

                  In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

                  1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
                    1. 50 °F (10 °C)
                    2. 40 °F (5 °C).
                    3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
                    1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
                    2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
                    3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
                    1. Last night.
                    2. Several weeks ago.
                    3. Can’t remember.
                    1. Reused as is.
                    2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
                    3. Washed with soap and hot water.
                    4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
                    1. Rare (140 °F).
                    2. Medium (155 °F).
                    3. Well-done (170 °F).
                    1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
                    2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
                    3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
                    4. Not sampled until baked.
                    1. Water.
                    2. Hot water and soap.
                    3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
                    4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
                    1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
                    2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
                    3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
                    4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
                    1. Wiping them on a towel.
                    2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
                    3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
                    1. Setting them on the counter.
                    2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
                    3. Microwaving.
                    1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
                    2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
                    3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
                    1. Diabetes.
                    2. HIV infection.
                    3. Cancer.
                    4. Liver disease.

                    The Clean Kitchen Test

                    In the home, food safety concerns revolve around three main functions: food storage, food handling and cooking. To see how well you’re doing in each, take this quiz, and then read on to learn how you can make the meals and snacks from your kitchen the safest possible. Choose the answer that best describes the practice in your household, whether or not you are the primary food handler.

                    1. The temperature of my refrigerator is:
                      1. 50 °F (10 °C)
                      2. 40 °F (5 °C).
                      3. I don’t know I’ve never measured it.
                      1. Cooled to room temperature, then put in the refrigerator.
                      2. Put in the refrigerator immediately after the food was served.
                      3. Left at room temperature overnight or longer.
                      1. Last night.
                      2. Several weeks ago.
                      3. Can’t remember.
                      1. Reused as is.
                      2. Wiped with a damp cloth.
                      3. Washed with soap and hot water.
                      4. Washed with soap and hot water, sanitized with a mild chlorine bleach solution.
                      1. Rare (140 °F).
                      2. Medium (155 °F).
                      3. Well-done (170 °F).
                      1. Made with raw eggs, and I sampled some.
                      2. Made with raw eggs and refrigerated, then I sampled some of it.
                      3. Store-bought, and I sampled some.
                      4. Not sampled until baked.
                      1. Water.
                      2. Hot water and soap.
                      3. Hot water and soap, then bleach solution.
                      4. Hot water and soap, then commercial sanitizing agent.
                      1. Washed and dried in an automatic dishwasher.
                      2. Left to soak in the sink for several hours and then washed with soap in the same water.
                      3. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and then air-dried.
                      4. Washed right away with hot water and soap in the sink and immediately towel-dried.
                      1. Wiping them on a towel.
                      2. Rinsing them under hot, cold or warm tap water.
                      3. Washing them with soap and warm water.
                      1. Setting them on the counter.
                      2. Placing them in the refrigerator.
                      3. Microwaving.
                      1. Buy only fish that’s refrigerated or well iced.
                      2. Take it home immediately and put it in the refrigerator.
                      3. Sometimes buy it straight out of a local fisher’s creel.
                      1. Diabetes.
                      2. HIV infection.
                      3. Cancer.
                      4. Liver disease.


                      Watch the video: Gennaros Fish Spaghetti (May 2022).


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